The Owlbear and the Wizard’s Staff: Warwickshire RPG mini-con. 22nd September, 2018.

Together with Matt (@chimpy20), Lee (@leejneilson) and Griff (@doc_griffiths), we are arranging a one-day RPG event in Warwickshire on 22nd September.

The Bear and the Ragged Staff is the symbol of the Earls of Warwick and, subsequently, of the County, and we thought eminently suitable for a D&D makeover, and hence  the Con’s name became The Owlbear and Wizard’s Staff.  Thanks to Mrs Griff for the stunning artwork.

We’re going to try and keep it simple.

RPG sessions morning and afternoon, with a lunch break.  Time for a trip to the pub at the end of the day.  We’ve hired the Band Factory in Leamington as our venue – lots of space to spread out tables, near the railway station, pubs, and places to eat.

We’ll open the doors at 9am and the first RPG sessions run from 10am-1.30pm, break for lunch, and second session run from 2.30pm-6pm.

So far, we have 6 tables confirmed for each session with very kind GMs offering their services.  Games on offer are likely to include Dungeon Crawl Classics, Lamentations of the Flame Princess, Star Trek Adventures, Numenera, Shadowrun, RuneQuest Glorantha, HeroQuest Glorantha, Call of Cthulhu, Space 1889,  Monster of the Week, Feng Shui, and Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay. Hoping to have a 7th table with Star Wars (AM) and D&D 5e (PM).

I’m waiting to finalise the venue hire and will then set up tickets via Eventbrite, ideally to be available in the latter part of March.

Hoping to see you there!

@asako_soh

asakosoh@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

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Reflections on a 2016 of gaming

It does seem a little narcissistic to write anything about my own RPGing over the last 12 months and apologies in advance, but I hope it is of some interest.  However, at least it will serve as a record to me of my RPG  activity and of my impressions at the end of the year. I’ve thought of a few themes that have stood out for me: GMing at Cons, gaming on-line, and what the actual games are I’ve played most of over the year. Despite the geopolitical horrors of the year, it’s been a good one for gaming.

Conventions

So, I think over the year I’ve managed to get to four gaming conventions and I was registered for Dragonmeet but sadly couldn’t attend in in the end. One of my goals for 2016 was to run some games at conventions.  I’ve run RPGs for groups, both face to face and on-line, and with gamers I’d not met before at clubs I’ve been part of over the years, but until 2016, hadn’t offered a gaming slot at an organised convention.

My first experience came at the kind invitation of @paulbaalham to run a game at the UK D&D Tweetup, held at The Dice Cup in Nottingham in March.  I’ve not played an awful lot of either D&D or Pathfinder, and Paul kindly let me offer a game of 13th Age, and I ran the excellent Free RPG Day adventure Make Your Own Luck , by the great Gareth Ryder-Hanrahan. I really enjoyed running this and was pleased that my players were people I’d met on Twitter. I should also thank Pelgrane, Wade Rockett and Cat Tobin for the stuff they sent to help me run the game. 13th Age remains my favourite level/class-based fantasy RPG.

So after my first experience, I was keen to do some more and offered up two games at the UK Games Expo in June.  I decided to go for a game I’d not had a lot of experience of and offer Shadow of the Demon Lord and an old favourite, Legend of the Five Rings.  For the former, I had a chance to playtest with some local gaming friends,  to try and figure out if it was practicable to run both a ‘starting’ and a ‘novice’ adventure, with levelling up in-between, in a 4-hour session.  This turned out to be do-able so I ran a double bill of  The Slaver’s Lash and The Demon’s Wet Nurse at the Expo.

For Legend of the Five Rings, I ran another Free RPG day release, this time Legacy of Disaster .  This latter session began a little badly – it was a Saturday morning and I’d dashed over to the Chaosium stand in the tradehall (7th edition CoC selling out!) and returned only five minutes before the start time, and two of my players gave me some grief for not being there at least 10 minutes before the start time (as specified in the instructions to GMs, apparently).  However, we recovered from this slightly rocky opening and had a great session – not least because a couple of the players knew the setting really well, and the others were new to it, and it was fun to see them getting into roleplaying honourable samurai with tough choices.

In addition to running, I was able to play in three excellent games too.  If my love of L5R doesn’t quite give it away, I very much enjoy Wuxia RPGs and was able to play in @gspearing ‘s game of Qin, and @boreders game of Symbaroum (of which, more later).  Finally, I was able to get a session in with players with whom I game on line with most weeks – we were all able to get tickets in on a 7th ed Call of Cthulhu game, run by Tim Evans. This was one of my best RPG experiences ever, not only because of the game, the players, and the GM, but due to the Twin Peaks elements of the story.

The next convention I attended was The Grand Tribunal in Cheltenham in August.  This originally was an Ars Magica convention but seems to have broadened to include other RPGs from Atlas Games too.  Here I didn’t run but managed to play in a couple of sessions – one of Ars Magica and one of Feng Shui, run by the excellent @dimbyd .  I didn’t really understand the freeform LARP which opened the day (I just wandered around aimlessly, being confused, until I decided to attack stuff – my tried and true RPG tactic), but it was a wonderfully friendly meeting, with a great raffle, and fish and chips.  Very grateful to @CJR23 for the warm welcome.  Here’s the link for the next Grand Tribunal 2017 .

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The final Con was the fabulous Grogmeet in Manchester in November, organised by Dirk the Dice from @theGrognardfile and the other Armchair Adventurers.  Dirk kindly let me run the old West End Games d6 Star Wars RPG and I used the adventure ‘Rebel Breakout’, from the 1987 1st edition of the game, and created an opening crawl.

The Revised Expanded Updated (‘REUP’) version of Star Wars RPG is free to download here and the free D6 Space rules are here

Here’s a fab video of the day from Dirk (Grogmeet 2016) showing some of the games happening at this very friendly event, and my own reflections on the game written for the Grogzine, which Patreons can download here .  I really enjoyed this day – it was great to meet the Adventurers in the flesh, enjoy a couple of pints afterwards, and a good chat on the train back with @doc_griffiths.  Looking forward to Grogmeet 2017 and thinking about Ars Magica, Marvel Super Heroes, FASA Star Trek RPG or 1st edition Legend of the Five Rings.

On-line gaming

Since meeting Tamsyn (@xtamsynx) and Craig (@craigpbrown) IRL at the 2014 UK Games Expo, we’ve been playing online most weeks – together with Col (@dampscot), Paul (spookshow71), Blakey (@Burekeii), and initially, Liam (@Evoroth).  This continued throughout 2016, despite busy lives, and we’ve played a wide variety of games including Call of Cthulhu, Far Trek, Astonishing Swordsmen and Sorcerers of Hyberborea, Solomon Kane, Rippers, Dresden Files Accelerated Edition, The One Ring, Shadow of the Demon Lord, Dragon Age, City of Mists, Monsterhearts, and a Fate Accelerated version of Nights Black Agents.

Far Trek RPG is free to download here and gives a super experience of playing in the Star Trek TOS setting. I was pleased to get a game of City of Mists in and I ran the free starter. It seemed to go well and gave me the chance of running a ‘Powered by the Apocalypse’ game – looking forward to the full game being released.

I’ve also been playing a regular on-line game of Star Wars Edge of the Empire RPG with @chimpy20 and @chrissyspill and others.  This took place most weeks, except for a bit of a gap when Matt was moving house during which I ran some of The One Ring.  Fantasy Flight’s Star Wars RPG has been the game I’ve played most of over the year – because of the weekly on-line game and that we’ve been playing it too in our face to face tabletop group. I’ve really liked the gradual character progression (with Xim Chamra now being a rather dangerous gunslinger and assassin), the flexible choices available, and, if you wish to get into it, the modifications the PCs can make to their ships and equipment.  The game’s mechanics keep every roll interesting and give the players a key role in generating narrative.  The game feels very dramatic with lots high action and I hope to play more in 2017.

In addition to these more regular games, I was very grateful to @dimbyd for inviting me to an ad hoc game of Feng Shui on roll20 and to @chimpy20, @rpgkitchen, @zos93, and Dave, from our tabletop group, for getting together at short notice to try the first playtest for Modiphius’ Star Trek Adventures (sign up here) .

RuneQuest 2 (or ‘Classic’) has a rather special place in my heart.  Not only did I play it ‘back in the day’, but when I moved to Warwickshire, and joined a local gaming club, it was the first RPG I got invited to join after a hiatus of about 12-13 years.  Hence, I was delighted by Chaosium’s kickstarter to republish this edition  and to join a game of RQ2, ‘The Sea Caves’ (part of the Old School Resource Pack), run by Dirk the Dice (@theGrognardfiles). We played as Humakt Ducks, with me as Mal Hard.  The screenshot below shows Eddy checking the fumble rules as he lost his left leg – yet again. Dirk has kindly written up the session here and here’s a link to another RQ2 game that Dirk ran for the RPG Academy crew just the other night.

There’s a lot of Glorantha on the horizon, not only Heroquest Glorantha (which I picked up from the UK Games Expo) but also 13th Age Glorantha and a new edition of RuneQuest (with design notes found here at Chaosium’s blog).

Games I’ve Played Tabletop

In addition to games on-line and at Cons, there have been those I’ve played around a kitchen table.  The year started well with a one-shot Pathfinder session.  Sadly, I can’t get to the Gaming Club I mentioned above at present (due to week day commuting) but we got together for a RPG session of ‘We Be Goblins’.  This was rather a hoot, but the amount of prep did surprise me.  Here’s the infamous Goblin Song and the free PDF of the adventure.

pathfinder

My main tabletop group meets every 4-6 weeks and we’ve had a good year.  We began with Keltia, run by Stef, before moving into Star Wars Force and Destiny, run by Matt (@chimpy20), and then moved the same PCs into an Age of Rebellion game run by Jimbo (@jimbohawkins).  This has been a great contrast to the on-line Star Wars game – more moral challenges and my PC, Minerva Voight (a seer/Makashi duelist) is much less combat-focused than Xim, having spent XP on developing her more supportive and divinatory force powers.

 

Stef and I have also met up with our families on a couple of occasions and played Hero Kids with the children.  Hoping to get another date together soon to try No Thank You, Evil!

 

I’ve also become part of an occasional Sunday morning group – we first met to try the new Conan RPG quickstart (available here free), but it was also where I tested out my plans for Shadow of the Demon Lord in preparation for the UK Games Expo.  Since then, we’ve tried The Strange, playing the highly recommended Eschatology Code and are now working our way through The Copper Crown campaign for Symbaroum. I’ve been really impressed by Symbaroum – I had a great time playing it at the Expo, and found it smooth to run.  Easy rules, players roll all the dice, and a very rich and evocative setting, with magic in the game being inherently corrupting.

Finally, I was lucky to get to a session of Dungeon Crawl Classics, run by @leejneilson, at a FLGS in Rugby, together with @doc_griffiths.  We played through the surreal and dangerous funnel adventure,  The Hole in the Sky, getting to the end but with a rather reduced party of PCs.  Hoping to do more – for a fun, gonzo, dungeon crawling experience, DCC is hard to beat.

Final Thoughts and Looking Forward

Looking at the above, I’m rather amazed at the amount of gaming I have got in over the year, despite work, family commitments, the need for sleep etc.  What is clear is that in terms of hours it has been the Star Wars RPG from Fantasy Flight Games which I have played most of, being both a tabletop and on-line game for this year.  On-line gaming has really opened up opportunities – it is much easier to play on-line for a couple of hours  in the evening after work, than arrange a 4-hour session face to face.  Plus, you don’t need to go out, and can raid the fridge for beer.  It has also meant that people I have met on-line or at Cons are now people I can game with.

At the end of the year, it is playing Symbaroum and reading the beta of Coriolis that are at the forefront of my mind.  I think 2017 will be a year where I hope to play more Swedish RPGs, including Mutant Year Zero and Tales from the Loop.  I also think that the RPGs being put out by Modiphius, using the 2d20 system will feature highly – I’m a huge fan of Star Trek and hope to do more of the play-testing and pre-order Star Trek Adventures in January, in advance of release at GenCon.  Several of us backed Conan, so that too will feature.

I like games of occult and magic, so hope to play Unknown Armies and Kult, and am always happy to play or run the excellent The One Ring, and I want to run some more Cthulhu (whether Trail or Call). I hope to try HeroQuest Glorantha (still sad to have missed @dimbyd’s Dragonmeet game) and gain some more experience of ‘Powered by the Apocalypse’ games – perhaps try Monster of the Week.   Of course, if I can find players that are up for it, the Rokugan of Legend of the Five Rings or the Mythic Europe of Ars Magica are also always waiting, and still want to play in any of the Worlds of Darkness. I’ve just finished off character creation for a PBEM game of King Arthur Pendragon, to start in the new year.

 

Finally, and thinking of the next generation, I’ve recently met the dad of one of my son’s friends.  He is a gamer too, and he and his son have been playing some Dungeons and Dragons 5e.  We’re all meeting up for some boardgames soon, but we both hope that may develop into some RPG sessions with our boys.

This has become rather longer than planned.  Apologies for wittering on and, if nothing else, the links may be useful. I hope everyone has a wonderful new year and best wishes for 2017.  I hope the dice land well for you and that we all get some good games in.

 

My contribution to Grogzine #1: Star Wars RPG, West End Games

Star Wars: The Roleplaying Game. 1st edition, 1987, West End Games.

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We didn’t go on holiday when I was growing up, and there were no gaming shops in my town.  A trip to the exciting metropolis of Birmingham, and the delights of Games Workshop and Virgin Megastore, offered the rare outlet for my RPG addiction (now serviced all too easily by Kickstarter and on-line stores).  However, in 1987 I found myself as a teenager on a somewhat surprising and surreal holiday – a trip to York to the see the recently opened Jorvik Viking museum, but with my mum, sister, and my former infant school teacher and her husband.  Wild times.  I recall a dingy B+B, with all my family in one room, and a bathroom shared with the other guests on the rest of the floor.  In addition to the stomach-churning smells of the museum (is it still the same?  I was too nauseated to ever risk going back), I do remember, to my delight, finding a gaming shop, and stumbling across the Star Wars RPG and buying it with some left over birthday money.  Although I’d been into RPGs for a few years by this point, I’d not been aware of the game having been released, so possibly the holiday coincided closely with the book’s publication in the UK.  Like many of our generation, I’d grown up on the original trilogy of films, and had been collecting the Star Wars Mattel toys when younger.  I was a Star Wars fan.  I can’t claim to ever have been an obsessive, always having a slight preference for the Trek universe, but Star Wars had action, romance and high adventure and the RPG was great fun to play as a teenager.

We played the game a lot – heading off to the local library in our lunch breaks from school to huddle around a table. One friend, keen to be a combat monster, went for the ‘Wookie’, or ‘Bounty Hunter’, and another, with our persuasion, the ‘Smuggler’, who handily came with a Stock Light Freighter for us to whizz around the galaxy in.  My own personal favourite was the ‘Failed Jedi’, whose personality was described as “Cynical, foul-mouthed, and pessimistic – but with a heart of gold.”  He could barely hit anything with his lightsaber, but started with both the Control and Sense Force powers, and the latter allowed you to parry blaster bolts.  Which I still think is a way cool thing to do.  Scum and villainy were battled, beautiful slave girls rescued, and evil Imperial commanders thwarted.

Re-reading the game over the summer, in parallel to playing the excellent recent iterations of the Star Wars RPG from Fantasy Flight Games, it struck me as a remarkably modern game.  The game merges attributes and skills, and rather than numbers, each has a value denoted by a number of dice, reminiscent of the Cortex system. However, what struck me most was how the templates and character generation system reminded me of RPGs ‘Powered by the Apocalypse’, and of the Feng Shui RPG:  playbooks/templates of archetypal characters from the setting (‘arrogant noble’, ‘brash pilot’, and the oft spoken of ‘quixotic jedi’) that could be easily modified by the player to create their individual PC. Each template came with a background, suggestions for connections to other characters, and a quote. A very quick and easy way to get started.  As us grognards know, it’s all been done before, and, much like music, was better in the 1980s.

Its perhaps not surprising that I have all the various Star Wars RPGs released since 1987.  What is clear, for the fans and those who’ve played them, is that it is the initial Star Wars RPG from West End Games, together with Fantasy Flight’s Edge of the Empire, Age of Rebellion, and Force and Destiny RPGs more recently, that gets the most admiration, rather than the d20 and Saga editions from Wizards of the Coast.  WEG d6 Star Wars is fast, simple, high action and gives all the feelz of ducking down corridors in the Death Star whilst pew-pewing white-clad Stormtroopers. The books released for the game were influential in their time, interfacing with other media outside of RPGs: they were reputedly used by Lucas Films as an overview of the Star Wars setting and given to authors to guide them when writing novels for the expanded universe.  The game itself went through three editions – the 1st in 1987 (the one I purchased in York, after the horrors of the Jorvik), the 2nd in 1992, and the ‘revised and expanded’ 2nd edition in 1996.   It is this latter edition that is the best and the one for Eddy to pick up from e-bay when on a bargain hunt.  However, if you don’t want to part with any cash, with ‘free’ being the best price,  a fan updated pdf of this is available at http://waveyourgeekflag.blogspot.co.uk/2015/04/star-wars-d6-reup-re-updated.html .

Since coming back to the game, my admiration for WEG Star Wars has been further reinforced by a recent podcast interview between Jim McClure and John Wick.  John was discussing his influences when creating my favourite RPG, Legend of the Five Rings.  He cited Pendragon (samurai, as knights, being constrained by honour and duty, but occasionally overwhelmed by passion) and WEG Star Wars.  From the latter he took the mechanics used for Force powers to underpin his system for magic and the spells and prayers of the shugenja of Rokugan.  And as we know, Wick, like Master Yoda, is wise in all things.  I’d like to think my enjoyment in playing my L5R PC, Asako Soh, a Phoenix clan Shugenja, is linked in some way to the fun I had in playing a grouchy, whisky-sodden Jedi in the 80’s.  Although Asako Soh’s personality is very different to my real life persona, I fear the cynical, boozy old man has got rather closer over the years.  To quote the Failed Jedi: “Kids.  Gah. Kids. You wanna learn how to use the Force? Listen when I talk to you. (Wheeze). Damn kids.  Where’s the whiskey?” Mysterious indeed are the ways of the force.

@Asako_Soh, September 2016.

Acknowledgements:

Many thanks to Dirk @theGROGNARDfile for permission to put the article here and for publishing it in the Grogzine.

Here’s a link to a film from the first Grogmeet where the Grogzine was launched:

Grogmeet16

Star Wars Edge of the Empire game: introducing Xim Chamra, Falleen Gunslinger

SW_EotEI’m excited to be starting playing in a Star Wars Edge of the Empire RPG game on Monday evening, run by @Chimpy20, with whom I regularly game at my place.

Here’s the background info we’ve been given:

The game will be Edge of the Empire based, but using content from the whole trilogy of books. You can use any source when creating your characters, but the only thing I ask if that someone playing owns a copy of the sourcebook you want to use. Let me know if you want to borrow any of my books.

You’ll be starting on the Inner Rim planet of Taanab, at the farming town of Arkridge. Arkridge rests on the rolling grasslands which cover most of Taanab. The planet is well known for it’s agricultural exports, and ships and planetary vehicles are coming and going all the time from Arkridge to the planet’s capital, Pandath, bringing in supplies such as clothing, machinery, and armaments, and departing with foodstuffs like meat, grain and vegetables. Arkridge has a population of about 2500, and is one of myriads of similar farming communities all over the planet. Taanab is on the Perlemian Trade Route, which runs from Coruscant all the way out to Wild Space.

The Galactic Empire has recently taken an interest in Taanab, having paid it little attention since the fall of the Old Republic. The Empire’s motivations in having a larger presence at the system are unclear. In recent months, Imperial dropships have been seen descending onto the grasslands and depositing mobile structures and leaving behind contingents of personnel and soldiers.

The timeline of the adventure is shortly after the Battle of Yavin and destruction of the first Death Star.

Your character should have a reason for being in Arkridge. This is likely to tie into your character’s Background, Motivation, and Obligation/Morality, but need not to. Feel free to make up an NPC/organisation or ask me to give you one, if you need to hook into a particular NPC/. Here are a few ideas:

– You’ve come to Arkridge to investigate the Imperial presence.

– You come from the area originally and are visiting friends or family

– You are a scientist or vet investigating some kind of problem with crops or animals.

– You fly a vessel transporting goods to and from settlements on Taanab.

– You are on the hunt of a criminal or wanted person and your trail has lead you to Arkridge.

– You are a member of the Rebel Alliance seeking support of locals

– You’re selling items of dubious legality to the farmers

– Or whatever you can imagine…

For simplicity’s sake I would prefer not to bring in the Duty system from AoR, but feel expressly free to use Morality from FaD if you are a force user, otherwise pick an Obligation. There are additional obligations in most of the EotE supplements.

@Chimpy20 has also mentioned that we would run Force and Destiny for our tabletop group, so despite the temptation, I thought I’d resist a Force-sensitive character and go for one from the Edge of the Empire books, given that is the main backdrop for the game.

Looking through the books, Smugglers appeal (either pilot or gunslinger), as do Explorers (scouts, or archaeologists) and Technicians (mechanic).  Other players have suggested that they may go for pilot and tech-types so I think a gunslinger may be fun.  I’m not one for playing combat-orientated PCs, but with this build I can perhaps diversify with some inter-personal and criminal skills.  The Falleen as a race seem to fit these ideas – links to the Black Sun, get Charm skill, and Beguiling Pheromones (upgrades Charm, Deception, and Negotiation at the price of some strain).

So here he is, Xim Chamra:

Falleen Smuggler Gunslinger, Xim Chamra

Concept: Xim was the son of a powerful Black Sun Vigo, related to Xizor. He grew up in luxury on Coruscant, conducting operations for his family and the organisation. However, his family recently fell out of favour in an inter-family conflict, many dying to Xizor’s faction. Xim managed to flee, the resources of Black Sun denied him and his details given to the Imperials. Both of these organizations are now hunting for him. Xim is hiding out in the quiet town of Arkridge, on Taanab, trying to set up independent criminal operations.

 Falleenn

Obligation 20, Bounty.

Brawn 2

Agility 3

Intellect 2

Cunning 3

Willpower 2

Presence 3

Beguiling Pheromones – 2 strain to upgrade charm, deception, negotiation.

Career Skills:

Charm 1

Coordination

Deception

Knowledge (Underworld) 1

Perception 1

Piloting (Space)

Skullduggery 1

Streetwise 1

Vigilance 1

Coercion

Cool 1

Knowledge (Outer Rim)

Ranged (Light) 2

Talents:

Rapid Reaction

Motivation: ambition (freedom).

 Wounds: 12

Strain: 14

Soak: 3

Gear:

Blaster pistol (damage 6, crit 3, stun setting)

Heavy clothing

Commlink

Stimpack

UK Games Expo 2014

Taken me rather longer than intended to post a few comments relating to my experiences of UK Games Expo – hectic couple of weeks at work, a nasty cold (perhaps picked up from the Con), and some gaming nights. So, this was my third UK Games Expo and my first at the new venue, having missed last year.  Also, this was the first year I got organised enough to take the Friday off work and book a room to stay over.  Plus, serendipitously, packed the game books for the games I was booked into – which proved to be a stroke of luck as it turned out.

Bag of Holding

Bag of Holding

I’d pre-booked into several RPG sessions and had managed to arrange it such that got to game with some friends I’d met via Twitter and the UK DnD Tweetups – hence, got to play The One Ring with @symatt and @craigpbrown, Star Wars Age of Rebellion with @pedr @jimbohawkins and @Evoroth, Shadows of Esteren with @tamsynx and @craigprbrown (an excellent dark adventure run by Gary Loveridge). Also had a superb game of 13th Age run by Steve Pettifer.  All the RPG’s I played in were great, but must admit that by Friday evening, after 12 hours of gaming, I was flagging a bit, but was ready for more on the Saturday! One of the things I may do next year is spread out the games a little more and ensure I had more time to wander the trade halls and attend some of the seminars.

13th Age

13th Age

Did get to play some excellent games of ‘two rooms and a boom’, with a massive group of players on the Saturday. One disappointment was that despite having booked onto Matt Dawkins’, the Gentleman Gamer’s, Numenera session, I’d not ultimately secured a place – I’d booked within a few mins of registration opening but there seems to have been a glitch such that some of the first bookings were lost on the system.

After I got over my English reserve, I thought that given I was carrying around a bag full of heavy RPG books, I could be cheeky and get some of them signed. This proved to be an excellent decision as not only did I get some signatures, but more importantly got to chat to gaming luminaries Sarah Newton, Monte Cook, Shanna Germain, and Nel from Shadows of Esteren, all of whom were marvellous and lovely.

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Shadows of Esteren: Universe – with extra art!

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Signed!

Signed!

My brief trip to the trade hall did allow me to do a bit of shopping, picking up two ‘All Rolled Up’ s, as well as a new book for Hellfrost and Sarah Newton’s Monsters and Magic, and a couple of Marvel Boosters, as well as some gifts for my children.

ARU and L5R dice!

ARU and L5R dice!

Marvel ARU and boosters

Marvel ARU and boosters

IMG_4313 Thinking back, I should have been more prepared for the queues for food and drinks at the venue and would have brought more provisions myself – as it was, I survived on a packed lunch, a binge-out thanks to the helpful people at Domino’s and their 50% off voucher, and the breakfast as part of the room stay.  Although, when I got to the front of the queue for breakfast at the hotel, most of the hot food had gone.

I’d certainly recommend the UK Games Expo to anyone interested in any table top gaming – whether it is RPGs, board or card games, or miniature skirmish or war games.  The organisers do an excellent job of putting on UK’s foremost gaming convention, a convention that every year expands beyond their expectations. I certainly hope to be there next year – this time with with lots of food in the car boot! An additional bonus from the con is having met and gamed with people I’d only knew on line previously and that the gaming spirit has continued and brought some of us together into a roll20 game of 13th Age online.